Post-doctoral fellow position in Tissue Morphodynamics Unit (Tanner Lab

A post-doctoral fellow position is available in the Tissue Morphodynamics Unit headed by Dr. Kandice Tanner at the National Cancer Institute. The Tanner lab combines biophysical and cell biological approaches to understand the interplay between tissue architecture and metastasis. We use a combination of imaging modalities, cell biology and animal models. It is expected that as a member of this lab, one will have an opportunity to be exposed to all these areas. We value a vibrant and collaborative environment where lab members share ideas, reagents and expertise and want to work on fundamental problems in the establishment of metastatic lesions.
Our lab is located in the NIH main campus in Bethesda. The research facilities at NIH are outstanding and the lab has state-of-the-art equipment such as multi-photon and confocal microscopes, FACS facilities and animal vivarium.
The position will be fully funded by the NIH. The successful candidate must have a Ph.D. in a relevant discipline (biomedical engineering, (bio)physics or mechanical engineering) with a strong publication record that reflects individual accomplishment, a demonstrated proficiency in optical physics, biology, image processing and algorithms development. Experience with optical tweezers, TIRF microscopy, confocal imaging, FRET/FLIM is a plus.
Prior hands-on experience, Matlab and/or LabVIEW programming development is expected. It is desired that the candidate has at least one first author publication. Other requirements include ability to work independently, as well as part of a team, strong verbal and written communication skills in English, strong motivation and most importantly a high level of creativity.
The successful candidate will interact with a diverse group of scientists with backgrounds in biochemistry, motor biophysics and cell biology.
The position offers a generous salary and benefits package as well as the possibility of further career advancement if performance is excellent.
Please send a CV, a one-page research experience summary and contact information of three references to Tannerkd@mail.nih.gov. Please write “Post-doc application” in the subject header.

Stan Israel Award Symposium–Monday March 19, 8:00 a.m.

The CMA encourages our friends and colleagues will join us for our outstanding lineup of speakers at the How to Foster Diversity in the Chemical Sciences Symposium at 8-11am in the Grand Salon B Sec 7, Hilton New Orleans Riverside.

Professor Pannell
Since arriving at U. T. El Paso Professor Pannell has personally mentored ~120 UG students in his organometallic research laboratory, resulting in >120 articles published with UG coauthors in the International refereed literature. Of these students, ~50% continued their studies to the graduate level at a range of Universities in the USA. Alumni from his group hold, or have held, faculty positions at a range of US Universities and Colleges, including Harvard; Princeton; Oklahoma State, U. Tennessee; U. T. El Paso, Calpoly, etc. His research program has been continuously funded by external sources such as PRF, NSF, NIH, Welch Foundation, NATO, etc.
In addition to this personal research mentoring, in his role as Director of the NIH Minority Access to Research Careers Program (MARC) (now titled the more politically correct “Maximizing Access to Research Careers) he has mentored a further 200 UG students of whom ~60% have continued on to Ph.D. studies and degrees.
Pannell has been served on several ACS committees, currently on CPRC, and has been the general chair, or related responsibilities, for four SW Regional Meetings of the ACS in El Paso TX. He is the recipient of the Stanley C. Israel SW Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences, the ACS Award for Research in an Undergraduate Institution and is a Fellow of the ACS.
He is currently the President Elect of the Texas Academy of Science, http://www.texasacademyofscience.org/ and for 30 years has hosted a weekly Public Radio program Science Studio, https://ktep.drupal.publicbroadcasting.net/podcasts/23/rss.xml for which he received the 1992 Texas Public Health Association Media Award.

Prof. Susan Olesik
Susan Olesik received her A.S. from Vincennes University B.A. from DePauw University in 1977 and her Ph.D. in 1982 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, under the auspices of James W. Taylor in field of analytical mass spectrometry. She was a postdoctoral fellow for Milos Novotny at Indiana University from 1982-1984 and for Tomas Baer at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill from 1984-1986. She has been a faculty member at The Ohio State University since 1986, being promoted to Associate Professor in 1992 and Professor in 1997. She is currently the Dow Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. She continues as the Director of the Ohio House of Science and Engineering (OHSE), a K-16 science outreach center.
Her awards include: 2017 The Analytical Scientist top mentor award, 2016 one of the Top 50 women in Analytical Sciences, 2015 The Analytical Scientist -100 Most Influential Analytical Scientists, ACS 2014 Helen M Free Award for Public Outreach, 2014 ACS Award in Chromatography, 2012 AAAS Fellow, 2010 OSU Building Bridges Excellence Award, 2009 ACS Fellow, 2008 ACS National Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences; 2008 Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences; OSU Alumni Association Heinlen Award-2006; 2005 Columbus Technical Council (CTC) Technical Person of the Year; 2004 ACS, Columbus Section Award for Outstanding Achievement & Promotion of Chemical Sciences; 2000 AWISCO Woman in Science Award; and a commendation from NASA for Contributing GC Column to Cassini- Huygen’s probe.
She is most known for research in three areas of separation science – Enhanced-fluidity Liquid Chromatography and nanoscale materials for chromatographic as well as mass spectrometric applications. Recent areas of study include studies of biologically relevant compounds and improving in efficiency in separation science and ionization efficiency in surface assisted laser desorption ionization (SALDI) using nanoparticle and nanofiber arrays and devices.

Prof. Javier Vela
Dr. Javier Vela is an associate professor of chemistry at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. He was born in Xalapa, Mexico, and grew up in Cuernavaca and Xalapa. He received his B.S. with Honors from the National Autonomous University of Mexico in 2001. He obtained M.S. and Ph.D. degrees working with Prof. Patrick L. Holland at the University of Rochester in 2003 and 2005, respectively. Before joining Iowa State in 2009, he was a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Chicago from 2005 to 2006, and a Director’s Postdoctoral Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies from 2007 to 2009. Trained as a synthetic inorganic and materials chemist, Dr. Vela’s current research focuses on the development of new nanostructured and optical materials for applications in chemical catalysis, energy conversion, and biological imaging. For his research and service work, he has received the LAS Institutional Service Award in 2017, the IUPAC Young Observer award in 2017, the Big XII Faculty Fellowship in 2017, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Advancing One Community Faculty Award in 2017, the Midwest Stanley C. Israel Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences in 2014, the LAS Early Achievement in Research Faculty Award in 2014, thre LAS Diversity Award in 2013, the NSF CAREER Award in 2013, the Top 40 Under 40 by Hispanic Engineering recognition in 2011, the LANL Director’s Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2007, and the ACS Inorganic Young Investigator Award in 2006. He also serves as Equity Advisor for the ISU College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for the period 2015-2018.

Prof. Daniel Rabinovich
Dr. Rabinovich obtained his undergraduate (B.S.) degree from the Catholic University in Lima (Peru) and a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Columbia University in 1994. After postdoctoral work at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, he joined the Department of Chemistry at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, where he is now a Professor of Chemistry. His research interests are in synthetic and structural inorganic, bioinorganic, and organometallic chemistry, documented in some 60 peer-reviewed publications. He is a regular contributor to Chemistry International, the IUPAC bimonthly newsmagazine and he was the recipient of the 2013 Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences (Southeastern Region).

Prof. Zaida C. Morales-Martinez
A Florida International University Chemistry Emeritus Professor, was born and raised in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, obtained a BS in Chemistry from the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras Campus and later an MS in Analytical Chemistry from The Pennsylvania State University. Zaida’s teaching career expands for 47 years: starting at her own alma mater in Puerto Rico, moving to Florida State University, University of Bridgeport in Connecticut and her last 30 years at Florida International University in Miami from where she retired in 2003 receiving the Distinguished Service Medallion at graduation ceremonies. Zaida joined the ACS in 1963, has been a Councilor for the Florida and South Florida Section since 1987, participating in various appointed and elected national committees. She was an instrumental member of the ACS President’s Task Force that established the ACS Minority Programs Office, the Committee on Minority Affairs (founding committee member) and the ACS Scholars Program in 1992. Zaida has been the ACS Scholars Program Mentoring Consultant since 1999. Over the year’s she has received numerous teaching and mentoring awards. In 2004, the ACS Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences; the ACS Board of Directors Volunteer Service Award to the American Chemical Society in 2004 ; and the Stanley C. Israel Regional Award for Advancing Diversity in the Chemical Sciences in the Southeast Region in 2017 .

Prof. J. V. Ortiz
J. V. Ortiz was born in Bethpage, New York in 1956 and attended public schools in Plainview, New York until 1973. After obtaining a B.S. in Chemistry with High Honors at the University of Florida in 1976, he began graduate work in the Quantum Theory Project of the same university and completed his dissertation in 1981 under the supervision of Yngve Öhrn, earning a Ph.D. in Chemistry with a certificate in Chemical Physics. After two years as a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University with William Lipscomb and at Cornell University with Roald Hoffman, he spent thirteen years at the University of New Mexico. In December, 1996, he joined the Chemistry Department of Kansas State University and was named a University Distinguished Professor in April, 2004. He became the first Ruth W. Molette Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Auburn University in August, 2006 and simultaneously began serving as Chairman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.
Dr. Ortiz has taught a variety of topics, from basic chemistry for nontechnical majors to advanced methods of quantum mechanics. He supervises a research group of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows that specializes in his area of research, quantum chemistry. This field is concerned with the prediction and explanation of the properties of atoms, molecules and solids using computers, principles of physics and mathematical methods. His group is engaged in the derivation and programming of new quantum mechanical methods for calculating molecular spectra. A special emphasis has been the development of ab initiopropagator theories which combine the rigor of many-body formalisms with chemically perspicuous orbital concepts.

Prof. Steven A. Lopez
Steven graduated from New York University in 2006 with a B.S. in Chemistry. During that time, he worked with Prof. James W. Canary to synthesize chirpotical switches as mercury detectors. His Ph.D. work focused on using computational chemistry (DFT, MD, QM/MM) to model chemical reactions in solution and charge transport in organic solids. After his Ph.D., he worked alongside Prof. Alan Aspuru-Guzik as a Department of Energy EERE postdoctoral fellow, and joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology at Northeastern University in August 2017. His research group uses QM, MD, and machine learning techniques to identify underlying structure-property relationships between the ground and excited states of organic molecules and rationally designing molecular targets in photomedicine and organic electronics. Steven is also the faculty advisor for the Northeastern University chapter of the Alliance for Diversity in Science and Engineering.

Exciting CMA events at the ACS national meeting

SYMPOSIA OF INTEREST:
LGBTQ+ Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Scholar Research Symposium (see PROF, Sun, Mon)
SOCIAL EVENTS:
Social Hour, 5:00 PM: Sun
Luncheon, 11:30 AM: Mon
BUSINESS MEETINGS:
Business Meeting, 7:30 AM: Sun

SUNDAY MORNING

LGBTQ+ Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Scholar Research Symposium
Emerging Applications of Organic & Biochemistry: Soil Science, Biomaterials & Synthesis
Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by ANYL‡, BIOL‡, BIOT, CHED, CMA, COLL, COMP‡, CWD, ENVR, INOR‡, MEDI‡, ORGN, PHYS‡, PMSE‡, POLY‡, PRES‡, WCC and YCC
SUNDAY AFTERNOON

LGBTQ+ Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Scholar Research Symposium
Experimental & Computational Frontiers in Inorganic & Materials Chemistry
Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by ANYL‡, BIOL‡, BIOT, CHED, CMA, COLL, COMP‡, CWD, ENVR, INOR‡, MEDI‡, ORGN, PHYS‡, PMSE‡, POLY‡, PRES‡, WCC and YCC
MONDAY MORNING
Section A
Hilton New Orleans Riverside
Grand Salon B Sec 7
How to Foster Diversity in the Chemical Sciences
Lessons Learned & Taught Through the Stories of Recipients of the Stanley C. Israel Award
Cosponsored by PROF and WCC
J. L. Sarquis, Organizer
D. Afzal, R. Joseph, Organizers, Presiding
8:00 Introductory Remarks.
8:05 1. Supporting university and K-12 students through outreach program. S.J. Olesik, J. Caton
8:25 2. Success in mentoring and training minority undergraduate scientists to Ph.D. degrees. K.H. Pannell
8:45 3. Diversity and inclusion in chemistry teaching and research: Some personal challenges and opportunities. D. Rabinovich
9:05 4. Nine years in the Midwest: A new beginning? J. Vela
9:25 Intermission.
9:40 5. Diversity and excellence: Advice for department chairmen. J.V. Ortiz
10:00 6. The Alliance for Diversity in Science and Engineering: Empowering graduate students. S.A. Lopez
10:20 7. Diversity: The key to excellence in chemistry. E.A. Nalley
10:40 8. My path for fostering diversity. Z.C. Morales Martinez
11:00 Concluding Remarks.
MONDAY AFTERNOON

LGBTQ+ Graduate Student & Postdoctoral Scholar Research Symposium
Sponsored by PROF, Cosponsored by ANYL, BIOL, BIOT, CHED, CMA, COLL, COMP, CWD, ENVR, INOR, MEDI, ORGN, PHYS, PMSE, POLY, WCC and YCC

Nature Article: Barriers in Science

The 22February 2018 Issue of Nature (Volume 554, Page 561) reports that discrimination still exists in the STEM workplace. A poll run by the Pew Research Center, a think tank in Washington DC, surveyed more than 2,300 US adults working in science, technology, engineering or maths (STEM) jobs. The findings underscore the reality that, for some in the sciences, gender and race are still a barrier to success (see go.nature.com/2esrhz5).

Read the whole article here.

Two Cancer Research UK funded Post-Doc positions

We are looking to recruit a Post-Doctorate Research Associate for a fixed term period of 2 years and full time with skills in cell biophysics to work on an exciting new Cancer Research UK funded project applying mechanobiology to study cell signalling.

The interdisciplinary project aims to study the mechanical activation of cell receptors, such as Notch, using novel technology developed in the Toseland lab. This approach is based around a fusion of magnetic tweezer based assays with high throughput-screening. You will work alongside an engineer/biophysicist to further develop this technology, and use this new technique, along with biochemical and cell imaging methods to monitor the receptor activity. We will aim to use this approach to perform drug screening assays under mechanically activated states.

To enhance the chances of success on this ambitious project, we encourage applicants with prior knowledge/experience of mammalian cell culture, cell imaging, cell signalling or force-based manipulation experiments (e.g. optical or magnetic tweezers).

As Post Doctoral Research Associate you will:

Develop an independent approach to the research project in both the design and execution of the necessary experiments.

Co-supervise with Dr. Chris Toseland and the postgraduate students working on the same project.

Take the lead in preparing manuscripts for publication describing the results of the work

Help supervise other lab members e.g. MSc/PhD students technically and academically

Attend national/international conferences relevant to the research and present research findings orally or as a poster.

Manage your own research and administrative activities, with guidance if required and report on progress regularly.

To be successful in this role you will have:

Training/experience with mammalian cell culture
PhD awarded (or about to be) in a relevant subject
Detailed experience of cell imaging (confocal/widefield)
Experience of molecular biology, Image analysis and processing and single molecule microscopy (SMLM)

The School of Biosciences is a part of the University’s Faculty of Science, and teaches undergraduate degree programmes in Biochemistry, Biology and Biomedical Sciences. Research projects are also undertaken in the same disciplines. The laboratory research interests of the School include:

o Protein Science
o Molecular Microbiology
o Biomolecular Medicine
o Genome Evolution

Start date for applications: 20th February 2018

Closing date for applications: 12th March 2018

Interviews are to be held: w/c 19th March 2018

Please see the links below to view the full job description and also to apply for this post. If you require further information regarding the application process please contact The Resourcing Team on jobs@kent.ac.uk quoting ref number: STM0885

Please note – applications must be made via the University’s online application system. You will be required to fill in the main details section of the application form as well as upload your CV and a cover letter. Your cover letter should clearly and explicitly address the requirements of the Person specification and you should provide clear evidence and examples in your application which back-up any assertions you make in relation to each criterion. We recommend a maximum of 4 x A4 sides for this document.

CVs or details sent directly to the department or via email cannot be considered.
——————–
Second position:
We are looking to recruit a Post-Doctorate Research Associate for a full time, fixed term period of 18 months, with skills in biophysics/engineering to work on an exciting new Cancer Research UK funded project to develop a new mechanobiology tool.

This is based around a fusion of magnetic tweezers with high-throughput screening. The PDRA will design and implement a system to apply a variable magnetic field across a microplate. The technology will be incorporated into imaging and microplate reader systems. The PDRA will work alongside a cell biophysicist to apply the technology to cell-based assays. We will aim to use this approach to perform drug screening assays under mechanically activated states.

To enhance the chances of success on this ambitious project, a research associate is required who has prior knowledge of designing/building magnetic tweezers, using electro-magnets or applying electromagnetic fields, and force-based manipulation experiments applied to biological systems.

As Post Doctoral research associate you will:
Develop an independent approach to the research project in both the design and execution of the necessary experiments.
Take the lead in preparing manuscripts for publication describing the results of the work
Use new techniques, methods and continually update knowledge and understanding of the field.
Help supervise other lab members e.g. MSc/PhD students technically and academically
Attend national/international conferences relevant to the research and present research findings orally or as a poster.
Manage your own research and administrative activities, with guidance if required and report on progress regularly.
To be successful in this role you will have:

Training/experience in working with Magnetic tweezers
PhD awarded (or about to be) in a relevant subject or equivalent
Detailed experience of designing/building magnetic tweezers
Training/experience with electromagnets/magnetic fields
To write up results for publication in scientific journals

The School of Biosciences is a part of the University’s Faculty of Science, and teaches undergraduate degree programmes in Biochemistry, Biology and Biomedical Sciences. Research projects are also undertaken in the same disciplines. The laboratory research interests of the School include:

o Protein Science
o Molecular Microbiology
o Biomolecular Medicine
o Genome Evolution

Start date for applications: 20th February 2018

Closing date for applications: 20th March 2018

Interviews are to be held: w/c 9th April 2018

Please see the links below to view the full job description and also to apply for this post. If you require further information regarding the application process please contact The Resourcing Team on jobs@kent.ac.uk quoting ref number: STM0886

Please note – applications must be made via the University’s online application system. You will be required to fill in the main details section of the application form as well as upload your CV and a cover letter. Your cover letter should clearly and explicitly address the requirements of the Person specification and you should provide clear evidence and examples in your application which back-up any assertions you make in relation to each criterion. We recommend a maximum of 4 x A4 sides for this document.

CVs or details sent directly to the department or via email cannot be considered.

Postdoctoral positions (Fluorescence Microscopy), University of Washington

Multiple postdoctoral positions are available immediately with Joshua Vaughan in the Department of Chemistry, whose interdisciplinary research group develops new chemical and optical tools for fluorescence microscopy for application to biological questions.
Highly motivated candidates with a background in biology, chemistry, engineering, or related disciplines are sought for two new projects: 1) An NIH-funded project focused on the development of new probes and methods for highly multiplexed probing of mRNA in cells and tissues, and 2) a non-federally supported project focused on the development of new fluorescence-based assays to read out the epigenetic state of single cells, to be used to study stem cell differentiation. Researchers will gain experience in the development of advanced methods for fluorescence microscopy (including single-molecule localization microscopy (e.g., STORM/PALM), expansion microscopy, structured-illumination microscopy) and the use of these methods to answer questions in cells and tissues. Funding is available for several years; initial appointment will be for one year, with potential renewal for one or more years if mutually agreeable.

Applicants should hold a Ph.D. in biology, chemistry, or a related discipline; significant experience in fluorescence microscopy, mRNA sequencing, epigenetics, quantitative biology, and/or optics is advantageous. To apply, email a cover letter describing your interests, a brief summary (no more than 1-2 paragraphs) of past and present research activities/accomplishments, expected date of availability, and a CV to Joshua Vaughan, and arrange for three letters of reference to be sent by email to jcv2@uw.edu; all application materials should be sent by March 14, 2018.

Michigan IRACDA Program is accepting applications

This NIH-supported program (https://iracda.umich.edu/) provides 4 years of postdoctoral funding and is targeted at fellows with strong interests in both research and teaching. IRACDA fellows spend 75% of their time doing research and 25% teaching, and the teaching is done in partnership with Henry Ford College and Wayne County Community College District in Detroit. Fellows can work with research mentors in the biosciences throughout the medical school or engineering.

Our website lists the full application requirements, but fellows must be US citizens/Permanent Residents, and have received their Ph.D. in the 12 months or will complete their thesis requirements before starting in August 2018. The application deadline is April 1, 2018.

Feel free to email me (dsept@umich.edu) if you or potential fellows from your group have questions. I will also be at the Biophysical Society Meeting next week and can provide more details in person.

RIT survey for lab experiences of advisors and deaf or hard of hearing students

Dear researcher,

This email is being sent on behalf Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) in regards to a survey we would like to conduct focusing on the lab research experiences of advisors and deaf or hard of hearing students. We are interested in any individual with limited or no signing ability who has advised a deaf or hard of hearing student in the last 3 years. If you fit these criteria and are willing to take part in this study, please respond to this post (augnts@rit.edu) with your preferred email address as well as the name and email address of the deaf or hard of hearing advisee with whom you worked. The survey will be sent by Dr. Austin Gehret from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at RIT and you can expect to receive it by end of February, 2018. If you do not wish to participate, no response is needed.

The survey has been approved by RIT’s IRB office and is completely voluntary. If you have any questions about the survey, please feel free to contact me.

Thank you for your consideration.

Austin

Austin U. Gehret, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Science & Mathematics
NTID/Rochester Institute of Technology
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 475-3971
augnts@rit.edu

Technical Grant Writing Workshops

The Office of Minority Health Resource Center offers University Vision, Design and Capacity (UVDC) technical grant writing workshops to provide university and health professionals with strategies to make grant proposals more competitive.

These hands-on, two-day workshops are for junior faculty, staff and college/university health professionals who are interested in community-based participatory research; committed to working with underserved populations; and want to build their institution’s capacity to compete and receive competitive grant awards.

https://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=3&lvlid=100&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

Technician position in Kelly Lee’s lab at UW

This will be a 100% FTE appointment that requires expertise in cell culture, protein expression and purification, DNA cloning and site-directed mutagenesis. This position requires the ability to effectively perform research and take responsibility for assuring quality, cost-effectiveness, and timeliness for large size projects.

The successful applicant will join a research project at the interface of biochemistry, structural biology, biophysics, and vaccine design. Our work focuses on structural and functional studies of influenza virus and HIV cell entry machinery with translational applications in the development of vaccines and virus inhibitors. The research is highly interdisciplinary and collaborative, which provides the opportunity to interact with scientists from different fields. In addition, the individual will have the opportunity to gain experience in advanced mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, spectroscopy, and virology.

Main research responsibilities include:

– Implement a pipe-line for recombinant protein expression and purification (this is currently being performed by multiple people in the lab, and we seek to consolidate this into a pipeline the new scientist would run).

– Carry out mutagenesis and cloning of new constructs for protein expression

– Assess the state of the purified materials using biochemical and biophysical assays such as SDS-PAGE, native gels, electron microscopy, light scattering, etc. Training available for biophysical approaches.

– Analyze, compile and prepare data for publications and grant applications.

– General lab functions including making solutions, weighing reagents, making buffers, setting up laboratory apparatus and instructions, reading and recording instrument data, keep laboratory records, taking part in preparing results for publications, maintaining cell culture and ordering lab supplies.

– Other duties around the lab as assigned and needed.

Requirements:

Bachelors degree or higher in biochemistry or related fields, and at least 1-3 years of experience in biological research wet lab environment.

Ability to work in biological wet lab environment: make buffers and solutions, express and purify proteins; keep lab records and experiment notebook. Experience running SDS-PAGE, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, ELISA and related biochemical assays.